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Cyclists make better employees!

The fact that people who cycle to work take less sick leave is just one of many interesting facts in a new Wikibook called Cyclebabble. In case you don’t know (I didn’t), Wikibooks are written by ‘The People’ – in this case the people who posted comments on the Guardian‘s cycling blog pages.

Just as with Wikipedia, the value of having so many people contribute is the vast range of experiences and ideas that you can tap into, including:

  • Cyclists have 40% less risk of dying from diabetes, certain cancers etc. (life insurance companies take note)
  • Why women cyclists are more likely to be killed than men (although cycling is actually safer than walking and gardening)
  • Tips on how to avoid having your bike nicked (e.g. paint it a horrible colour) and tactics used by bike thieves, from an ex-thief
  • The legal position of drunk cyclists
  • The legal status of cycle lanes
  • The great Red Light Debate
  • The ‘shower in a bottle’
  • Avoiding punctures, and imaginative repair ideas
  • The world’s worst cycle lanes (www.gu.com/p/2cxn5)

Also (inevitably) lots of slagging off of the enemy (road users with four or more wheels).  One of the more creative suggestions in the book is that cycling should be made a religion, so that abusing cyclists becomes illegal!

The blog/comment format makes it a very easy book to pick up and put down.

Every cyclist, road users especially, should read it.

Attention all cyclists – let’s try to get our own cycling top tips together. Please post a comment below with your no. 1 tip.

7 Responses to “Cyclists make better employees!”

  1. Tony Armstrong says:

    Absolutely right! Cyclists make the perfect employees. Not only are they fitter (and look better as a result) but they can use all that time to solve personal (and business) problems whilst they pedal away all of the frustrations. Think of the green benefits too if you get all employees out of their cars & cycling to work. They also learn how to be resourceful doing stuff like mending punctures. It’s the perfect business solution!

  2. andrew.gray says:

    Thanks Tony.
    The other thing is we (cyclists) can be more reliable turning up on time- not being subject to the whim of traffic congestion, roadworks etc to the same extent as 4+ wheelers.

  3. Neil Crofts says:

    After 7 years of commuting across London, from Twickenham to various locations including a six month stint to Orpington (21 miles) I have some experience. Other advantages include cyclists arrive at work awake – rather than in a train/car induced coma. Cyclists also have a built in icebreaker with their colleagues – like a healthy version of smokers gossip. There are a few disadvantages too – I arrived at work on the day our photos were being taken with a grazed chin after a close call with a pedestrian.

  4. andrew.gray says:

    Thanks for posting your comments Neil.
    Actually, I think that the point about arriving at work awake may be the most important one. Research with school kids shows that those who walk to school learn much better than their chauffeured class-mates and I am sure the same principle applies at least as much to adults.

  5. Tony Armstrong says:

    And there is another benefit of cycling to work – exercise first thing in the day seems to raise metabolism and provides reserves of energy to keep you going when others flag

  6. My top tip would be choose your route carefully. Don’t automatically pick the most direct option, the same one you’d drive. Often with a bit of planning and experimentation, you’ll discover a more more scenic journey with far less traffic, giving you both exercise and relaxation. And if it’s a little bit longer, hey, so much the better!

  7. andrew.gray says:

    Good point Trevor. We tend to be focused on minimising journey time, especially to and from work. But when you are enjoying and benefiting from the travel, you need to change you mind-set. I must take this advice on board personally!

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